Throwback Tuesday: Jean-Michel Basquiat (1960 - 1988)

Throwback Tuesday: Jean-Michel Basquiat (1960 - 1988)

14th January 2014 // By warholst
Jean-Michel Basquiat was a Haitian-American artist who carried a neo-expressionist style that splashed across surfaces in New York during the late 70s-80s where hip-hop, post-punk and street art life intermingled. His work combined words, poetry and doodles which spoke loudly to challenge racism. I find his art exuberant, political and hectic with a zany scrawling lilt to it.

In the beginning, he was a part of graffiti group called SAMO: (“same old shit”) marked the witty sayings of a precocious and worldly teenage mind that, even at that early juncture, saw the world in shades of gray, fearlessly juxtaposing corporate commodity structures with the social milieu he wished to enter: the predominately white art world.' Franklin Sirmans, In the Cipher: Basquiat and Hip Hop Culture During the height of his career, Basquiat worked with Andy Warhol, David Bowie and many other artists because his fusion-style of work attracted attention. You can still spot him as the disc jockey in Blondie’s music video, Rapture. For a glimpse into his world, check out the film, Jean-Michel Basquiat - The Radiant Child. This is just a quick run down intro about the artist as surmised from his wiki page. See the official site for more details & art. His influence has also popped up in art and music as seen in the work of Jay Z, Frank Ocean, Macklemore and various hip-hop artists.

Google+